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Mar Vista Palms

Mar Vista is a family-oriented community where joggers, dog-walkers, and baby strollers are part of the daily scene. Residents enjoy local restaurants and shopping along Grand View and Venice Boulevard.

Mar Vista is an economically diverse neighborhood of apartment buildings and single-family homes. The hilly areas near its border with Santa Monica, whose spectacular ocean views give Mar Vista its name, hold some of the most expensive land in the community.

Mar Vista is bordered by Santa Monica to the north, Palms and Culver City to the east, Marina del Rey to the southwest and Venice to the south.

In 1886, when “The Palms” was established, it was the first suburb of the City of Los Angeles. At that time it was mostly farms on the vast reaches of Rancho La Ballona. The next year, an ornamented, Eastlake-style train station was built near today’s Motor Avenue and National Boulevard, halfway between Downtown L.A. and Santa Monica.

Neighborhoods

  • Westdale
    Westdale is a quiet neighborhood that first developed as World War II GIs were returning home. Developer Paul W. Trousdale, purchased a tract of 450 single-story homes in 1947 that offered 5 varying floor plans. In time 2 more tracts boosted the amount of homes to approximately 900. These homes were sold at prices of $14,500 to $16,500. The neighborhood of Westdale is quaint and quiet with streets lined with pines, purple-blossom jacarandas, and liquid amber trees that were originally planted.

    Westdale is situated west of I-405, with Palms Boulevard to the south, Inglewood Boulevard to the west, National Boulevard to the north, and Sawtelle Boulevard to the east. It is easy to access the 405 freeway as well as the 10 freeway from Westdale, but because of dead-end streets commuters are unable to access shortcuts in the residential area. 
  • The Westdale Residential Planning District is a post-World War II planned residential subdivision in Mar Vista, bounded generally by National Boulevard on the north, Inglewood Boulevard on the west, Palms Boulevard on the south, and Sawtelle Boulevard on the east. The district contains approximately 800 parcels developed primarily with one-story single family residences, with some two-story residences constructed as later infill. Other components include a series of one-story, three- unit residences along National Boulevard, as well as a public park and an elementary school. Designed in the Minimal Traditional and Ranch architectural styles, individual residences display many features typical of large-scale post-war tract housing, and there are several common designs seen throughout the development. Common features include medium-pitched front- or side-gable roofs, smooth stucco exterior cladding with brick or wood accents, wood divided-light double-hung windows, recessed entry porches, fixed wooden shutters, and interior brick chimneys. Garages may be attached or detached, and accessed via concrete driveways.
  • Westside Village
    An upscale residential area located in Palm’s northwest section.
  • Westside Village Homeowners Association (Zone 1)
  • North Westdale (Zone 2)
  • Westdale (Zone 3)
  • Mar Vista Neighbors (Zone 4)
  • Hilltop Neighbors Association (Zone 3 & 4)
  • South Mar Vista Neighborhood Association (Zone 5 & 6)
  • West Mar Vista Neighborhood Association (Zone 6)
  • The Barrington Multi-Family Residential Historic District is composed of 28 two-story multi-family residences located along a single block of Barrington Avenue, between Navy and Indianapolis streets, in Mar Vista. All of the apartment houses were constructed in 1953 and are designed in the Mid-Century Modern and Minimal Traditional styles. Of the 28 buildings, 25 are contributors to the district; 3 are non-contributors.
  • The Oval” Planning District is a residential subdivision composed of approximately 200 parcels in Mar Vista. The subdivision is bounded generally by Venice Boulevard on the north, Inglewood Boulevard on the west, Washington Boulevard on the south, and McLaughlin Avenue on the east, and is developed primarily with one- and two-story single-family residences. The area is bisected by Washington Place, which is developed with apartment buildings. The district features a unique oval-shaped interior street pattern. Residential lots feature deep uniform front setbacks. At each end of the oval there are two triangular “island” lots, bordered by roadways on all sides, each containing a single-family residence. Other features of the district include concrete sidewalks and wide landscaped parkways lined with mature palm trees.
  • Palms Residentail Nighborhoods
  • Palms West
  • overland
  • motor
  • exposition
  • studio
  • Business Districts
  • The Venice/Grand View Commercial Historic District is composed of 20 one- and two-story commercial buildings along the south side of Venice Boulevard between Centinela Avenue on the west and Grand View Boulevard on the east; and the west side of Grand View Boulevard between Venice Boulevard on the north and Pacific Avenue on the south, in Mar Vista. Constructed between 1924 and 1960, individual buildings are exclusively commercial in use, set at the sidewalk, and designed in the popular architectural styles of the period, including Spanish Colonial Revival, Art Deco, Late Moderne, and Mid-Century Modern. Typical building features include flat roofs with parapets, stucco exterior cladding, large display windows, and canopies or awnings. Other features of the district include concrete sidewalks and mature street trees. Of the 20 properties within these boundaries, 16 are contributing resources to the historic district; three are non-contributors.
  • Colonial Corners Commercial Historic District is composed of three one- and two-story commercial buildings, located at the intersection of Barrington Avenue and National Boulevard in Mar Vista. Situated at the convergence of several residential neighborhoods, these buildings respond to surrounding development in their pedestrian scale and orientation and articulated facades. Designed in the American Colonial Revival style, each building displays a similar but unique design. Common features include white stucco and red brick exterior cladding; boxed eaves with wooden balustrades at the roofline; divided-light wood windows with fixed shutters; partially-glazed, divided-light wood doors; heavy lintels over window and door openings; and Colonial columns. One building displays an upper-story balcony; another features a brick exterior chimney. In addition, each building presents a double-height, eight-sided tower at the corner, their most prominent feature. Taken together, these three similarly-styled commercial buildings are a visual landmark for the surrounding neighborhoods.
  • Venice/Grand View Commercial Historic District is composed of 20 one- and two-story commercial buildings along the south side of Venice Boulevard between Centinela Avenue on the west and Grand View Boulevard on the east; and the west side of Grand View Boulevard between Venice Boulevard on the north and Pacific Avenue on the south, in Mar Vista. Constructed between 1924 and 1960, individual buildings are exclusively commercial in use, set at the sidewalk, and designed in the popular architectural styles of the period, including Spanish Colonial Revival, Art Deco, Late Moderne, and Mid-Century Modern. Typical building features include flat roofs with parapets, stucco exterior cladding, large display windows, and canopies or awnings. Other features of the district include concrete sidewalks and mature street trees. Of the 20 properties within these boundaries, 16 are contributing resources to the historic district; three are non-contributors.
  • palms businesses districts
  • pacific electric
  • charnock ranch
  • palms depot

Mar Vista

Grandview

Palms

Motor

Points of Interest

  • Mar Vista Farmer’s Market
    Fresh Produce and more every Sunday at Grand View and Venice Blvd.
  • Cultural Monument
    Mar Vista’s cultural monument is a tree, the Moreton Bay Fig Tree on National Blvd and Military Ave. It was planted in 1875. 
  • Museum of Jurassic Technology
    Like a coat of two colors, the Museum serves dual functions. On the one hand the Museum provides the academic community with a specialized repository of relics and artifacts from the Lower Jurassic, with an emphasis on those that demonstrate unusual or curious technological qualities. On the other hand the Museum serves the general public by providing the visitor a hands-on experience of “life in the Jurassic”

Locals Advice

Japanese Market and Food Court